Deep South Dining

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Deep South Dining | Open For Business

More than just a place to eat, local restaurants are gathering places for friends and a vital business for the local economy. Today Malcolm and Carol talk with restaurant owner Jeff Good about the affect COVID-19 had on hid business and the way he managing these uncertain times. Also with the fall season making its arrival Felder Rushing (The Gestalt Gardener) joins the show to talk about your fall vegetable garden. Let’s eat y'all!    


Persimmon Pudding

(as mentioned by Carol during the show)


INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tablespoons/56 grams butter, melted, plus more for the dish
  • 5 Fuyu persimmons (about 2 1/4 pounds), trimmed and chopped
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 cups/400 grams sugar
  • 1 teaspoon/8 grams baking soda
  • 1 cup/240 milliliters buttermilk
  • 1 ½ cups/190 grams all-purpose flour
  • 2 ½ teaspoons/12 grams baking powder
  • 1 cup/240 milliliters heavy cream
  • ¼ teaspoon/ 1 1/2 grams salt
  • ½ teaspoon/3 milliliters vanilla extract
  •  Dash of cinnamon


PREPARATION

  1. Heat oven to 325 degrees and butter a 2-quart baking dish. Purée persimmons in a food processor or blender until smooth. Strain pulp through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl, using the back of a spoon or a spatula to push purée through. Measure out 2 cups of pulp (discard remaining pulp).
  2. Combine eggs, sugar and persimmon pulp in a large bowl and beat with an electric mixer on medium speed until well mixed. Stir baking soda into buttermilk, then add to persimmon mixture and beat to combine.
  3. In a separate bowl, sift together flour and baking powder. Beat flour mixture into persimmon mixture in 3 batches, alternating with the cream, beginning and ending with the flour.
  4. Stir in melted butter, salt, vanilla and cinnamon. Transfer batter to prepared dish and bake until pudding is set, 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes.

Link: http://nyti.ms/1tb0EGa

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